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 Posted:   Sep 15, 2019 - 6:53 PM   
 By:   Preston Neal Jones   (Member)

(Okay, El 'Iverance, let's see you scoop me on this one!)

This coming Sunday, Sept. 22, CBS News Sunday Morning, the weekly 90 minute omnibus show, will feature a segment about John Williams. If you can't watch or DVR the program, the Williams piece will probably be available on Youtube and at the network's own website.

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2019 - 7:37 AM   
 By:   thx99   (Member)

Streaming video and transcript:
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/john-williams-and-anne-sophie-mutter-on-across-the-stars/

Also, an extended transcript including items that didn't make the final broadcast (e.g., a very short bit on The Rise of Skywalker) can be found here:
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/extended-transcript-john-williams-on-steven-spielberg-star-wars-and-the-power-of-music/

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2019 - 5:03 PM   
 By:   Traveling Matt   (Member)

As stubbornly modest as he is brilliant.

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2019 - 7:14 PM   
 By:   Ed   (Member)

This is about as happy and enthusiastic as I’ve seen him in recent years. Nice to see the work hasn’t been a burden.

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2019 - 9:00 PM   
 By:   townerbarry   (Member)

One of the Very Best!

 
 Posted:   Sep 22, 2019 - 9:57 PM   
 By:   ZapBrannigan   (Member)

It was interesting to hear him say the work has taken him away from his kids and so on, even for films that weren't that important. It's the kind of thing you don't think about as a fan.

And from a curiosity standpoint, I enjoyed learning that he doesn't listen to music himself, and why.

 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2019 - 7:50 AM   
 By:   Dana Wilcox   (Member)

It was interesting to hear him say the work has taken him away from his kids and so on, even for films that weren't that important.

I understood him to say that “what I do is not important”, i. e., scoring films, particularly in contrast to spending time with family. It was an amazingly humble observation, and one that perhaps is forgotten by us fans in the heat of our various enthusiasms. Such brilliance and humility so rarely co-exist in one human being. Great interview, and what a guy!

 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2019 - 7:53 AM   
 By:   judy the hutt   (Member)

It was interesting to hear him say the work has taken him away from his kids and so on, even for films that weren't that important. It's the kind of thing you don't think about as a fan.

And from a curiosity standpoint, I enjoyed learning that he doesn't listen to music himself, and why.


too bad - he is missing out.

 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2019 - 8:49 AM   
 By:   judy the hutt   (Member)

It was interesting to hear him say the work has taken him away from his kids and so on, even for films that weren't that important. It's the kind of thing you don't think about as a fan.

And from a curiosity standpoint, I enjoyed learning that he doesn't listen to music himself, and why.


too bad - he is missing out.


Actually I believe JW is not being honest. Why did he donate all of his film scores to Julliard? He must have understood their importance.

He is great and if he doesn't believe it, well ....!!!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2019 - 10:19 AM   
 By:   Mike_H   (Member)

It was interesting to hear him say the work has taken him away from his kids and so on, even for films that weren't that important. It's the kind of thing you don't think about as a fan.

And from a curiosity standpoint, I enjoyed learning that he doesn't listen to music himself, and why.


There’s an interview from awhile ago where JW says to his daughter something to the effect of, “I wasn’t around all that much, was I?” It really is an all consuming endeavor with him.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2019 - 12:19 PM   
 By:   Rnelson   (Member)

He is the type of artist who's work you fall in love with then discover you love more once you meet the artist themself.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2019 - 12:25 PM   
 By:   governor   (Member)

It was interesting to hear him say the work has taken him away from his kids and so on, even for films that weren't that important. It's the kind of thing you don't think about as a fan.

And from a curiosity standpoint, I enjoyed learning that he doesn't listen to music himself, and why.


too bad - he is missing out.


Actually I believe JW is not being honest. Why did he donate all of his film scores to Julliard? He must have understood their importance.

He is great and if he doesn't believe it, well ....!!!


Exactly.

He knows the influence and impact of his film works. For hardcore fans, remember his interview with his pal Andre Previn, way back.

He said something like he wanted his scores to be associated with films giving the chance for them to be heard.


He may sounds modest, yes, but he knows when he delivers a home run...

Mr Williams is a hardworker. He had the great good fortune of being at the right place at the right time.

As far as his family is concerned, well, it is another story.

 
 Posted:   Sep 23, 2019 - 7:31 PM   
 By:   Death Incarnate   (Member)

Fun to see him as always. The same puff piece they always do, but hey, it's a network morning talk show, not American Masters on PBS.

What I find so interesting about John Williams is this 2nd chapter of his life, that we all live in. He was married for 18 years to his first wife who died in 1974. Then he did Jaws the next year, and ushered in the modern blockbuster scores for the next 45 years. And while he did professional music successfully for years (Peter Gunn piano!), and scores for Towering Inferno and Fiddler On The Roof, and TV work - Jaws was the turning point for not just him, but I feel blockbuster film scores in general, for better and worse. I'm a bigger fan of Jerry Goldsmith and Bernard Herrmann, but I can't deny Williams' accomplishments as "the Beatles of film scores." I believe their acceptance in the public eye with epic stature, grandiosity, majestic beauty, etc. is all owed to him. And all because he wrote absolutely fabulous and beautifully melodic themes to amazing films. The various themes to Indians Jones, Star Wars, Superman, and ET are more than just music. They're part of the popular culture and lexicon in musical language. I find it so sad his first wife never go to see all these amazing accomplishments of the past nearly half a century. To even live the first half of his life is amazing accomplishments for anyone. But to never know what happened to John Williams after 1974 is a tragedy of Greek proportions.

I think his scores for JFK and Nixon are some of his moodiest and most understated stuff he ever did. Those scores are so sublime for their restraint and lack of bombast (OK, Nixon has the RNC speech, but still). Still waiting on that JFK expansion!

I also love the idea he didn't do Jaws until he was 43. As a musician and artist, you never know when it's all going to turn around in different ways.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2019 - 1:58 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

I also love the idea he didn't do Jaws until he was 43. As a musician and artist, you never know when it's all going to turn around in different ways.

Sure, but I think you're underestimating his accomplishments prior to JAWS. He was considered one of the most promising young composers in the late 50s and early 60s (VERY prolific across TV, film, concert works, arrangements and pianist gigs!), really made his first A list film in 1966, with HOW TO STEAL A MILLION, was nominated for his first Oscar the year after with VALLEY OF THE DOLLS, WON the award itself in 1971 for FIDDLER, had a vibrant and progressive 10-year-relationship with 'enfant terrible' Robert Altman and churned out a couple of successful disaster pics, among other things, before he met Spielberg and eventually did JAWS.

So it's not like it was some 43-year-old nobody getting his big break on JAWS. He had a very accomplished career already, basically on the level James Horner was in the early 90s (prior to BRAVEHEART and TITANIC). So it's more like it cemented him firmly among the A list composers at the time.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2019 - 6:26 AM   
 By:   Rozsaphile   (Member)


Actually I believe JW is not being honest. Why did he donate all of his film scores to Julliard? He must have understood their importance.


Lots of good reasons: Gratitude to his school . . . Disposing of mountains of paper . . . Tax deduction . . .Estate planning . . . Central location for interested researchers . . .

 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2019 - 7:07 AM   
 By:   townerbarry   (Member)

I also love the idea he didn't do Jaws until he was 43. As a musician and artist, you never know when it's all going to turn around in different ways.

Sure, but I think you're underestimating his accomplishments prior to JAWS. He was considered one of the most promising young composers in the late 50s and early 60s (VERY prolific across TV, film, concert works, arrangements and pianist gigs!), really made his first A list film in 1966, with HOW TO STEAL A MILLION, was nominated for his first Oscar the year after with VALLEY OF THE DOLLS, WON the award itself in 1971 for FIDDLER, had a vibrant and progressive 10-year-relationship with 'enfant terrible' Robert Altman and churned out a couple of successful disaster pics, among other things, before he met Spielberg and eventually did JAWS.

So it's not like it was some 43-year-old nobody getting his big break on JAWS. He had a very accomplished career already, basically on the level James Horner was in the early 90s (prior to BRAVEHEART and TITANIC). So it's more like it cemented him firmly among the A list composers at the time.


Damn not here please...let that hack Rest In Peace...pluuuueeezzzz.

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2019 - 2:23 PM   
 By:   BrendonKelly   (Member)


Damn not here please...let that hack Rest In Peace...pluuuueeezzzz.

Totally unnecessary, disrespectful and inappropriate. Why post that?



 
 
 Posted:   Sep 24, 2019 - 5:44 PM   
 By:   henry   (Member)

I really enjoyed that video. At 87 Williams is still sharp and seems like he is in pretty good shape!

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2019 - 8:25 AM   
 By:   Rnelson   (Member)


Actually I believe JW is not being honest. Why did he donate all of his film scores to Julliard? He must have understood their importance.


Lots of good reasons: Gratitude to his school . . . Disposing of mountains of paper . . . Tax deduction . . .Estate planning . . . Central location for interested researchers . . .


And maybe... generosity?

 
 
 Posted:   Sep 25, 2019 - 8:34 AM   
 By:   governor   (Member)

I also love the idea he didn't do Jaws until he was 43. As a musician and artist, you never know when it's all going to turn around in different ways.

Sure, but I think you're underestimating his accomplishments prior to JAWS. He was considered one of the most promising young composers in the late 50s and early 60s (VERY prolific across TV, film, concert works, arrangements and pianist gigs!), really made his first A list film in 1966, with HOW TO STEAL A MILLION, was nominated for his first Oscar the year after with VALLEY OF THE DOLLS, WON the award itself in 1971 for FIDDLER, had a vibrant and progressive 10-year-relationship with 'enfant terrible' Robert Altman and churned out a couple of successful disaster pics, among other things, before he met Spielberg and eventually did JAWS.

So it's not like it was some 43-year-old nobody getting his big break on JAWS. He had a very accomplished career already, basically on the level James Horner was in the early 90s (prior to BRAVEHEART and TITANIC). So it's more like it cemented him firmly among the A list composers at the time.


Andre Previn kept saying in the sixties he was going to be the next major Hollywod composer.

How to steal a Million was so important...

 
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