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 Posted:   Dec 24, 2009 - 9:19 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

After having watched ninety thousand versions of A Christmas Carol over the years, I'd really like to try a British Christmas Pudding. You know, that thing you light on fire after dousing it with Brandy (you're a fine girl).

I've always threatened my wife with a "traditional" English Christmas dinner, as I'd like to have goose and all that, just to live the illusion, I guess.

Please delight the olde boarde with your family recipes, traditions, etc. What's the Timmer tradition? What's Tall Guy's brood's take? How does Bill Carson groove with a pudding? This "yank" is interested.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_pudding

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2009 - 10:15 AM   
 By:   MusicMad   (Member)

We do a lot of the English/British Christmas thing ... a large part of which is due to the insistence of our daughter (now 20!) who wants it as it always was, etc.

So this morning we collected the goose (bloody expensive! - that's an old Englsh phrasesmile) ... though we struggled to get out of the estate after last night's snowfall ... and we already have the Christmas tree / lights / trimmings (though in moderation) and we'll open our presents around the tree before breakfast.

As for dinner, slightly different in that we eat late afternoon/early evening and yes, the goose with all the accessories (one reason we don't eat around 1.00-2.00pm) followed by Christmas pudding. My wife used to make one (or several, in fact) earlier in the year but for various reasons has not done so for the last two or three years and so we resort to a retail shop brand. We have set fire to puddings in the past but after you've done it once or twice ...

Oh, and a drop (bottle) or two of alcohol. A good rich red wine with the goose, preceded by a sharp white. It sures helps with the clearing up afterwards.

My cousin is taking his family (incl. aged mother) to a Chinese restaurant for Christmas dinner but that doesn't seem to garner any positive responses from my family!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2009 - 10:32 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)


Please delight the olde boarde with your family recipes, traditions, etc. What's the Timmer tradition? What's Tall Guy's brood's take? How does Bill Carson groove with a pudding? This "yank" is interested.


Luckily our kids are spending Christmas with drivingmissdaisy so we can have a long lie in, followed by a leisurely walk through t'snow to t'local hostelry for a nice turkey dinner with no clearing up whatsoever.

And then I woke up...

We do have a pudding every year, shop bought (but from the "Finest" range, none of your "Basics" crud for us, thank ye very much) - but there's only one kind of goose Mrs Tall Guy ever gets.

And it looks as if I'll be picking up me Mum and dropping her off at home again, as she doesn't like driving in the snow any more. It means I can't drink until very late in the evening, but it's better than letting her spend the day on her own.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2009 - 11:17 AM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

So what is IN British Christmas pudding? I'm curious. How do you make it, ingredients, etc.?

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2009 - 12:19 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

So what is IN British Christmas pudding? I'm curious. How do you make it, ingredients, etc.?

http://www.squidoo.com/christmaspuddingrecipe

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2009 - 3:26 PM   
 By:   joan hue   (Member)

Wow, that is quite a production. Thanks William.

 
 Posted:   Dec 24, 2009 - 5:25 PM   
 By:   WILLIAMDMCCRUM   (Member)

Good luck with it, Joan, but I should warn you, it's VERY VERY stodgy ... you can only eat a bit of it at a time!

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2009 - 5:21 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Although I prefer the traditional Norwegian Christmas foods and meals, I'd be curious to try out the British or American versions, with all kinds of weirds meats, puddings, pies and poultry.

 
 Posted:   Dec 25, 2009 - 6:06 AM   
 By:   Jehannum   (Member)

I remember eating Christmas pud as a kid, being full up with the third mouthful because it's so dense and rich but wanting to eat more.

 
 Posted:   Dec 21, 2011 - 9:18 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Is anyone having Christmas pudding this year?

 
 Posted:   Dec 21, 2011 - 9:24 AM   
 By:   johnjohnson   (Member)

Is anyone having Christmas pudding this year?

Hope so.

I usually get mine from World Market.

http://www.worldmarket.com/home/index.jsp?ab=header:logo

 
 Posted:   Dec 21, 2011 - 9:25 AM   
 By:   mildcigar   (Member)

Is anyone having Christmas pudding this year?[/endquo

Negative - Chocolate Yule Log 4 me.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 21, 2011 - 9:47 AM   
 By:   CinemaScope   (Member)

I've never liked any Christmas food, Christmas pud, Christmas cake, mince pies, mulled wine. I'm just a miserable old sod. The family usually make me a chocolate cake. I do like Christmas dinner, but who doesn't like a roast dinner in the winter. I did manage to buy a Heston Blumenthal Christmas pudding from Waitrose, they're like gold dust, I could have sold it on ebay! I've bought a Belgian chocolate sponge pudding for me.

 
 Posted:   Dec 21, 2011 - 10:13 AM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

Mine is in the fridge, shop-bought from the local 'English shop' (actually Scottish). They were selling little tiny ones as 'individual servings' designed for one or two; but I love my pud, so I spent $25 and bought a 'family-size' version, weighs 2lbs (just under 1kg), serves 8. My nan used to make the family pud when I was growing up in England, and sometimes she'd make two, saving one for next year. By then, it had really steeped and it was delicious. Merry Christmas.

 
 Posted:   Dec 21, 2011 - 10:50 AM   
 By:   CH-CD   (Member)

Well, JIm...I think most people in the UK buy their puddings ready made today. But, if you really want to have a go, here is how to make your own, traditional Christmas Pudding.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=Pb_lJxL1vtk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5yOVX3GhpM&feature=relmfu

You serve it with a white brandy, or rum sauce, or brandy butter.

It's very filling, and after a huge turkey lunch, we usually end up having the pudding around tea time on Christmas Day.

Enjoy!

 
 Posted:   Dec 21, 2011 - 10:54 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

Mine is in the fridge, shop-bought from the local 'English shop' (actually Scottish). They were selling little tiny ones as 'individual servings' designed for one or two; but I love my pud, so I spent $25 and bought a 'family-size' version, weighs 2lbs (just under 1kg), serves 8. My nan used to make the family pud when I was growing up in England, and sometimes she'd make two, saving one for next year. By then, it had really steeped and it was delicious. Merry Christmas.

Well, Jim...I think most people in the UK buy their puddings ready made today. But, if you really want to have a go, here is how to make your own, traditional Christmas Pudding.


Like dogplant, today we also went to our local "Brit Shop" and they had a ready-made one by "Elizabethan Pantry." It wasn't the family-sized one, but more like enough for two people.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 22, 2011 - 7:07 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)

It wasn't the family-sized one, but more like enough for two people.

UK family size is the same as your "serves two" range...

 
 Posted:   Dec 22, 2011 - 7:13 AM   
 By:   Jim Phelps   (Member)

It wasn't the family-sized one, but more like enough for two people.

UK family size is the same as your "serves two" range...


Yes, I see it's "only" two pounds. (lbs.) Actually, the one I saw was a mere 8 ounces. Here's the two pounder:

http://www.madeinbritainltd.com/elpachpuw2lb.html

 
 Posted:   Dec 22, 2011 - 10:02 AM   
 By:   Adm Naismith   (Member)

This would not be the most traditional British Christmas Pudding, but it is easier and lighter and quite tasty in it's own right.
I've served it after Prime Rib and Yorkshire Puddings.

Nigella Lawson's Easy Sticky-Toffee Pudding
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/nigella-lawson/easy-sticky-toffee-dessert-recipe/index.html

 
 Posted:   Dec 22, 2011 - 10:16 AM   
 By:   dogplant   (Member)

UK family size is the same as your "serves two" range...

Chris, I forget the make of the little dinky ones they were selling, but they were about the size of one of those little tinned Heinz steam puddings (Spotted Dick, anyone?). You could easily hold one in the palm of your hand. My eight-serving monster (made by Matthew Walker) is about the size my grandmother used to make, which will fit on an average dinner plate. One thing though: I doubt that it contains a sixpence piece!

 
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