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 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 10:25 AM   
 By:   Tall Guy   (Member)


Not quite sure if I'd really want to have those "non-prolific" composers doing more films. Part of the attraction for me of Peter Schickele, Denny Zeitlin and those one-offs is that their sole venture into cinema produced such brilliant scores. I wouldn't want them going on to do something which might be merely serviceable.



Great point... Allow me to add Konrad Elfers to the list for Funeral in Berlin.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 10:41 AM   
 By:   BillCarson   (Member)

Operation Daybreak and The Squeeze by David Hentschel.

Francis Monkman Long Good Friday.



 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 10:46 AM   
 By:   orion_mk3   (Member)

One of the things I've really liked about the latter-day Varese Club is its releases of LPs from non-prolific composers who had their careers tragically cut short.

Doug Timm would be a good example. Nightflyers is a primo synth score and it would have been wonderful to see that style in a more acoustic setting, though tragically that was not to be.

Careful, He Might Hear You was mentioned already, but I'll say it again: definitely one of the most moving, emotional, and joyous scores out there. So lush, and yet there was only ever a single unreleased score from Ray Cook before he died.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 5:34 PM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

A lot of good ones already mentioned. I'll add Angela Morley- Watership Down.
(Five minutes of recorded music was cut from the film and the score album was almost completely replaced with a song album!)


I have the Pendulum CD. But, from memory, I only remember one song on it "Bright Eyes", which
of course was used in the film as well. Am I missing something here?

I like the score well enough, that I wish I had thought of it when I first posted. Great music and an enjoyable film as well.

Wasn't most of the score actually credited to Malcolm Williamson?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 6:20 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

One of the things I've really liked about the latter-day Varese Club is its releases of LPs from non-prolific composers who had their careers tragically cut short.

Doug Timm would be a good example. Nightflyers is a primo synth score and it would have been wonderful to see that style in a more acoustic setting, though tragically that was not to be.

Careful, He Might Hear You was mentioned already, but I'll say it again: definitely one of the most moving, emotional, and joyous scores out there. So lush, and yet there was only ever a single unreleased score from Ray Cook before he died.


Indeed. Does anyone know what that 'other' score - 1985's REBEL - sounded like?

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 9:11 PM   
 By:   Ray Worley   (Member)

The clear winner for me is Philip Sainton's MOBY DICK. Although EYE OF THE DEVIL is a worthy contender.

Some of the choices here are rather odd as a quick imdb check would confirm.
Randy Newman????? Seriously? 137 credits and some 15 Oscar Nominations. That's not even borderline.
And as much as I love DARK OF THE SUN and for the longest time it was the only Jacques Loussier score I ever heard of...he has 70 titles in his filmography from 1963 to 1997. How does that possibly qualify as non-prolific or a “fleeting” time?

I suppose a case can be made depending on your definition of "prolific" but even some mentions here like Don Ellis, Hugo Montenegro, George Bassman and others are suspect. They worked steady if not Morricone prolific.

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 10:17 PM   
 By:   orion_mk3   (Member)

Double post, apologies.

 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 10:25 PM   
 By:   orion_mk3   (Member)

Wasn't most of the score actually credited to Malcolm Williamson?

It's a really complex story: http://www.angelamorley.com/site/watercues.htm

Indeed. Does anyone know what that 'other' score - 1985's REBEL - sounded like?

No idea. But I've tried to look it up before and found out that it is a musical with 9 songs by Peter Best of Crocodile Dundee fame. The film also won an AACTA award, the Aussie Oscar, with Chris Neal, Peter Best, Billy Byers, and Bruce Rowland credited alongside Ray Cook. So it seems likely that Cook's music was incidental and likely brief.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 17, 2013 - 10:54 PM   
 By:   bobbengan   (Member)

Wasn't most of the score actually credited to Malcolm Williamson?

Indeed. Does anyone know what that 'other' score - 1985's REBEL - sounded like?

No idea. But I've tried to look it up before and found out that it is a musical with 9 songs by Peter Best of Crocodile Dundee fame. The film also won an AACTA award, the Aussie Oscar, with Chris Neal, Peter Best, Billy Byers, and Bruce Rowland credited alongside Ray Cook. So it seems likely that Cook's music was incidental and likely brief.


That's a shame, though I'd still be interested to hear it regardless. I played CHMHY for John Mauceri, the [as of recently, ex] chancellor of my school about two years ago, and I remember him being blown away by it (he compared that magnificent main title cue, favorably, to the 'Lever du Jour' movement of Ravel's "Daphnis et Chloe"). For those not aware, Mauceri is a huge film scoring advocate who conducts concerts all over the world, and does them regularly in LA all the time. He'd also never heard of Ray Cook outside of the context of this score.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 5:02 AM   
 By:   Bill Finn   (Member)

Wasn't most of the score actually credited to Malcolm Williamson?

It's a really complex story: http://www.angelamorley.com/site/watercues.htm


Thanks for that bit.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 11:20 AM   
 By:   Jon C   (Member)

I have to add Bruce Rowland's Man From Snowy River. Magnificent!

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 11:33 AM   
 By:   Yavar Moradi   (Member)

40 items on Rowland's filmography doesn't disqualify him?
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0006263/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

Yavar

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 11:37 AM   
 By:   Justin Boggan   (Member)

Bill Finn:

Wasn't most of the score actually credited to Malcolm Williamson?


As Morley told in an old interview, Williamson was the first composer on the film and did something like 11 minutes of score before he was replaced. All of his score is supposed to be in the film. If I remember correctly, it's mostly in the beginning of the film.



"The Red Canvas"
James Peterson

This was from a few years ago. MSM released it (OOP). You can still find it for a good price on SAE.

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 11:45 AM   
 By:   Jon C   (Member)

40 items on Rowland's filmography doesn't disqualify him?
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0006263/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

Yavar


I understood this to mean film scores (not TV) and by my (rough and dirty) count, I would argue that 14 scores in 40 years is "non prolific." Admittedly he is not lacking for work though.

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 11:48 AM   
 By:   Advise & Consent   (Member)

And as much as I love DARK OF THE SUN and for the longest time it was the only Jacques Loussier score I ever heard of...he has 70 titles in his filmography from 1963 to 1997. How does that possibly qualify as non-prolific or a “fleeting” time?

It may seem like a lot, but 70 titles over three and a half decades is rather slight compared to the composer's other activities. And for people weaned on caped heroes or spaceship movies, Monsieur Loussier is probably a non-entity, alas.

So, I feel almost duty bound to put Dark of the Sun (and other great scores he composed) forward by as many means as possible.



http://www.amazon.com/Dark-of-the-Sun/dp/B0013DZA1C/ref=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1374173722&sr=1-1&keywords=dark+of+the+sun

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 12:00 PM   
 By:   Alfachrger   (Member)

40 items on Rowland's filmography doesn't disqualify him?
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0006263/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

Yavar


I understood this to mean film scores (not TV) and by my (rough and dirty) count, I would argue that 14 scores in 40 years is "non prolific." Admittedly he is not lacking for work though.


Another non-prolific "film" composer who kept busy with TV and stage works as well as acting and directing is John Rubinstein. I love his folksy score (along with help from Tim McIntire) for Jeremiah Johnson.

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 12:29 PM   
 By:   Other Tallguy   (Member)

Ladyhawke gets a little too rockin’ some times but MAN that love theme is stupendous.

Sky Bandits?!? Is that movie available anywhere? I can’t believe anyone but me remembers that movie. Including the people who made it!

 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 3:45 PM   
 By:   gsteven   (Member)

Ernst Toch (et. al.) PETER IBBETSON

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 5:17 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

Would it be safe to say being prolific is all relevant ?

 
 
 Posted:   Jul 18, 2013 - 5:18 PM   
 By:   dan the man   (Member)

CARAVANS-79-MIKE BATT-Very nice score.

 
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