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 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 4:33 PM   
 By:   Senn555   (Member)

INTRADA Announces:



FALLING DOWN
Music Composed by JAMES NEWTON HOWARD
INTRADA Special Collection Vol. 265


James Newton Howard's score to the 1993 film Falling Down marked his third collaboration with Joel Schumacher, after Flatliners (1990) and Dying Young (1991). He begins the score with an arresting portrait of irritation and building fury -- jungle drums and abrasive effects grating at anti-hero William Foster until a low, angry horn announces his exit from his automobile and the beginning of his crusade against society. It's the start of a score featuring a complex meld of orchestral music blended with multiple layers of electronics and percussion, both real and synthesized. In keeping with the grim tone of the movie, Howard removed trumpets from the scoring (save one in two very key sequences). By omitting the upper brass register, he was able to lend the music an aura of intensity and impending tragedy without overt signs of warmth or optimism.

To present the world premiere release of James Newton Howard’s score, Intrada was given access to the entire digital scoring session masters vaulted at Warner Bros. The scoring sessions were engineered at Todd-AO by veteran Shawn Murphy, who emphasized the crisp edge this particular score warranted; subsequent mixes were made by Murphy at Capitol Records.

In Falling Down, Michael Douglas plays William Foster, a former defense engineer who has lost his job and, in an ugly divorce, his family. As the film opens, Foster simmers in a Los Angeles traffic jam, finally abandoning his car in disgust. He quickly runs afoul of a Korean grocer and a couple of gangbangers, setting off a series of events that spirals out of control. Weary and seemingly disoriented, he keeps claiming he’s simply trying to get home for his daughter’s birthday, and he does so while placing increasingly threatening calls to his ex-wife (Barbara Hershey). A retiring cop, Prendergast (Robert Duvall), pursues Foster across Los Angeles, eventually facing down the engineer in a fateful confrontation in Venice.

INTRADA Special Collection Vol. 265
Retail Price: $19.99
Available Now
For track listing and sound samples, please visit
http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.8530/.f

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 4:34 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

D-Fens!!!!!!!!

Wooooooooooooooooo!

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 4:41 PM   
 By:   Senn555   (Member)

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 4:42 PM   
 By:   theMaestraX   (Member)

ORDERED by 11:30!

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 4:45 PM   
 By:   Tronix   (Member)

I can't see the powerful track, one of my favourites, “You missed”. Where is it? Are we sure it is complete? frown

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 5:00 PM   
 By:   The Mutant   (Member)

I can't see the powerful track, one of my favourites, “You missed”. Where is it? Are we sure it is complete? frown



It's part of "Drive By Shooting" they just put both cues together from what I can tell. Relax, it's on there.

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 5:08 PM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)

Well, that figures. They combined all the highlights of the score, all the tracks you've wanted for almost 21 years, into suites. The track you want is probably within the "Drive-By Shooting" suite. They buried the "Bill Comes Home" cue, one of the highlights of the score (it's in the trailers, along with the "Pier" cue), buried it after the 5 minute "Caretaker" track, right where it doesn't belong. The famous "Pier" cue is now after "Prendergast Takes The House. In the film, they kinda go together, but linking them in such a non-musical way on the album---you can hear it in the sample of "Til Death Do Us Part"---robs you of that explosion of sound that starts the cue.

HUGE disappointment from a gigantic fan of this score.

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 5:36 PM   
 By:   Deadwalker   (Member)

Ordered

What's the name of the movie your making?

Under Construction

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 6:28 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

Well, that figures. They combined all the highlights of the score, all the tracks you've wanted for almost 21 years, into suites. The track you want is probably within the "Drive-By Shooting" suite. They buried the "Bill Comes Home" cue, one of the highlights of the score (it's in the trailers, along with the "Pier" cue), buried it after the 5 minute "Caretaker" track, right where it doesn't belong. The famous "Pier" cue is now after "Prendergast Takes The House. In the film, they kinda go together, but linking them in such a non-musical way on the album---you can hear it in the sample of "Til Death Do Us Part"---robs you of that explosion of sound that starts the cue.

HUGE disappointment from a gigantic fan of this score.


You just echoed my sentiments for the Matrix Reloaded set from last year.

Who in Goldsmith's name decided making suites of seperate cues was a good idea?

STOP THAT, PEOPLE.

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 6:50 PM   
 By:   SchiffyM   (Member)

Who in Goldsmith's name decided making suites of seperate cues was a good idea?

Not my decision, but I'm generally in favor of it.

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 7:05 PM   
 By:   LeHah   (Member)

Who in Goldsmith's name decided making suites of seperate cues was a good idea?

Not my decision, but I'm generally in favor of it.


Dem's fightin' wurds where I come frum! Put 'em up!

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 10:15 PM   
 By:   DeviantMan   (Member)



What???
Is this a hint?????!!!!

big grin

 
 Posted:   Jan 20, 2014 - 10:28 PM   
 By:   Joe Sikoryak   (Member)

Well, that figures. They combined all the highlights of the score, all the tracks you've wanted for almost 21 years, into suites. The track you want is probably within the "Drive-By Shooting" suite. They buried the "Bill Comes Home" cue, one of the highlights of the score (it's in the trailers, along with the "Pier" cue), buried it after the 5 minute "Caretaker" track, right where it doesn't belong. The famous "Pier" cue is now after "Prendergast Takes The House. In the film, they kinda go together, but linking them in such a non-musical way on the album---you can hear it in the sample of "Til Death Do Us Part"---robs you of that explosion of sound that starts the cue.

HUGE disappointment from a gigantic fan of this score.


Allow me to share a message from Douglass Fake himself:

Normally I can read negative comments, smile and move on. But this one by Shaun Rutherford is filled with so many factually incorrect comments and fictitious cue titles that it's hard to pass by. We did not create "suites", James Newton Howard wrote long cues and the film editors dialed things in and out as needed. We chose to include the full length cues. And our assembly follows the film, except in cases where we actually have more music than what is used in the film. Every cue is where it was intended, including the entire "Caretaker" sequence and all of the music for the final pier scene.

Perhaps Shaun saw a different movie than what we worked with. In any case, I will stand by what Howard composed, recorded and actually supervised with us - and what all of us at Intrada, Warner Bros. and Howard's camp finally made available after those "21 years" that Shaun refers to. It is sort of sad that the wait disappoints him. We ourselves are delirious that the album has finally come to be, with every note Howard recorded included and in state of the art sound no less.

I have a certain respect for the FSM board and often learn things. But negative posts with factual errors like this one sadly do bring the level down. --Doug

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2014 - 1:19 AM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

Ordered and can't wait to get it in my hot little hands. The samples on the website sound great and I actually like the way they flow. This score has always been a fave of mine and I'm happy there's even more music on it than I expected.

While its too bad that Doug responded because of some negative comments, I found the info in his post to be really interesting about how the score was originally conceived by Howard.

Thanks Intrada for releasing this!

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2014 - 3:43 AM   
 By:   Shaun Rutherford   (Member)



Allow me to share a message from Douglass Fake himself:

Normally I can read negative comments, smile and move on. But this one by Shaun Rutherford is filled with so many factually incorrect comments and fictitious cue titles that it's hard to pass by. We did not create "suites", James Newton Howard wrote long cues and the film editors dialed things in and out as needed. We chose to include the full length cues. And our assembly follows the film, except in cases where we actually have more music than what is used in the film. Every cue is where it was intended, including the entire "Caretaker" sequence and all of the music for the final pier scene.

Perhaps Shaun saw a different movie than what we worked with. In any case, I will stand by what Howard composed, recorded and actually supervised with us - and what all of us at Intrada, Warner Bros. and Howard's camp finally made available after those "21 years" that Shaun refers to. It is sort of sad that the wait disappoints him. We ourselves are delirious that the album has finally come to be, with every note Howard recorded included and in state of the art sound no less.

I have a certain respect for the FSM board and often learn things. But negative posts with factual errors like this one sadly do bring the level down. --Doug


Thanks for passing on Doug's response, Joe.

First of all, the cue titles, like the ones Intrada used for their 2 Days In The Valley release (ahem), are my own, used in my post only as a guide so people who've seen the film can understand which tracks I was referring to.

Not sure what Doug means about seeing different films. There's the film and then there are the cues as written. In certain cases, Doug and company have created "suites" by combining several separately-recorded cues (this is not always like the John Williams stop-and-start recording process where the cues were meant to be played continuously, a process not followed by the Indy box set). I know from the film that some of these cues play continuously like that, but there's a musical way to do it for album release and a way that slavishly follows how it plays in the film.

The drive-by sequence features a separately-recorded extension for the aftermath (before Bill approaches the car), meant to be tacked onto the original cue, but to put the track I'm calling "Shooting Lessons" (for the sake of perspective) after that cue does a disservice to one of the score's highlights. Who among us is happy that those thrilling opening piano notes from The Empire Strikes Back's "The Battle In The Snow" -- not heard in the film, mind you -- are buried 4 minutes into a giant suite of cues? You can't tell us that the edit point in "Til Death Do Us Part," created by you and your team and not how James Newton Howard recorded it, sounds like it makes any sense musically or in terms of listenability.

I get it that I'm just some idiot without a degree in album assembly, that's fine. But as I've said elsewhere, when you have highlights of the score, clear highlights, why not use what is the whole point of compact discs, and have index points for easy access? I like the score as a whole, but if we're supposed to listen to the score as a whole every time, why not just give us 1 70-minute track?

You're welcome to disagree with me, obviously. You made the album and I did not. I would've gone a different way is all. I think James Newton Howard, left to his own devices, would have done it differently as well.

Shaun

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2014 - 5:26 AM   
 By:   Francis   (Member)

Listening to the samples and sounds stellar. I'm not that familiar with the score to know what's been patched together or not, but I generally find intrada's choices on these edits to work well and get used to them.

I do miss the days when I'd order this type of release right away, but it's definitely on the wish list for a next order.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2014 - 5:53 AM   
 By:   TerraEpon   (Member)

Shaun does have a point -- Intrada CONSISTENTLY shies away from the very obvious solution of simply adding more track points (one good example I'm reminded of is Amazing Stories - The Mission), even though the music would be 100% unaffected. I believe Doug when he says the music is grouped as written/recorded but there's no reason each track has to be a 'full piece' as it were. I have so many CDs where even classical movements are broken up into larger tracks, sometimes many of them.

 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2014 - 6:27 AM   
 By:   DavidCoscina   (Member)

Doug and Intrada. thanks for releasing this score. Most of us are quite happy to be able to own this gem by JN Howard.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2014 - 7:00 AM   
 By:   Joe Brausam   (Member)

I personally agree with Intrada's approach to this stuff - and I also like the 14 minute Battle of Hoth suite. It just makes the music a little more substantial.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 21, 2014 - 7:05 AM   
 By:   Thor   (Member)

Well, I think EVERYTHING should be made into suites, even far more radical than this! The closer it gets to the parameters of classical music (or other music written for its own purpose) and the further it gets from the movie, the better!

But that's just me, of course.

 
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