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 Posted:   Dec 27, 2007 - 8:23 PM   
 By:   Moonie   (Member)

http://www.mmmrecordings.com/The_Blob/1955-tracks/1955-tracks.html


ordered my copy!


sd smile

 
 Posted:   Dec 27, 2007 - 9:19 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

Thanks for the knowledge. I'll send you a card. I don't know who's more excited- you, or MMM.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2007 - 3:01 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

One of the lucky few who got one of the "advance" copies we had (caused by our manufacturer somehow only completing about 2% of our order -- the remaining 98% is being completed as I type...) posted the first review about our latest release:

http://monsterkidclassichorrorforum.yuku.com/topic/14119

 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2007 - 3:38 PM   
 By:   Moonie   (Member)

Cool!!


sd smile

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2007 - 4:29 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

One of the lucky few who got one of the "advance" copies we had (caused by our manufacturer somehow only completing about 2% of our order -- the remaining 98% is being completed as I type...) posted the first review about our latest release:

http://monsterkidclassichorrorforum.yuku.com/topic/14119


Ooh, one of the lucky few! I stopped reading his "review" (I don't believe the gentleman is a "reviewer" - just one of the lucky ones) after this amazingly hyperbolic line:

"THE BLOB is on-par, if not better than any cues scribed out by the masters of strings, Bernard Herrmann or the experts of leit motif, such as Erich Wolfgang Korngold or Max Steiner. "

I'm looking forward to the arrival of my copy, and I'm sure I'll enjoy it, but comparing Carmichael with Herrmann, Korngold, and Steiner is the height of something-or-other.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2007 - 4:37 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

While I know it's not an official "review" (because no reviewers have been sent any discs as yet), at least it's some feedback of some kind. And at least it's well-written -- better than what I read in some official reviews!

And I'm well aware of the hyperbole, because he's obviously too much of a fan of the film to be entirely objective! But he's on-the-mark with many of his comments, and I'm happy he mentioned the string writing of Bernard Herrmann. I hear a resemblance between some of THE BLOB's score and Herrmann's work on the later PSYCHO.

You'll also hear some very Herrmanesque music in some of the Valentino library cues, but in these cases, it was probably those composers writing in Herrmann's then-familiar style.

No, THE BLOB is not up there with the best of Korngold, but few scores are. And it's not that type of score. But it is a very solid and atmospheric horror score, and it has been seldom-recognized over the years for its effectiveness. I think it's responsible for much of the mood of the picture.

 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2007 - 6:11 PM   
 By:   Moonie   (Member)

I remember seeing this movie awhile back and sorta liking it, but loved the music so I looked for the score after I saw the movie, and of course didn't find it, so Im real glad to finally see its release, and hopefully soon in my hot little hands.

sd smile

Thanks MMM!!

 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2007 - 6:15 PM   
 By:   Steve Johnson   (Member)

I just want that swell song.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2007 - 7:02 PM   
 By:   haineshisway   (Member)

I just want that swell song.

I remember seeing the film at LA's Stadium theater (my favorite of my childhood theaters), and loving every minute of it. My local music store, Index Radio and Records, couldn't get the 45 of the song, which I desperately wanted. Then one day I found an LP (which I still have to this day) called Pop Hit Party on Columbia, a compendium of songs by various artists, like Firefly by Tony Bennett. And there it was on that LP - The Five Blobs singing The Blob.

 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2007 - 7:12 PM   
 By:   Charles Thaxton   (Member)

I actually got to speak to Ralph Carmichael a couple of years ago on the phone...I had emailed him wondering about getting a copy of the score way before MMM announced their plans to do the CD. Mr. Carmichael told me Valentino's contact info and they sold me a CDR (at a hefty price) I guess I should've waited, huh David?
Anyway it's a great score and you should all buy one (as I will to hear the other Valentino library cues) Too bad MMM didn't try to get 4D MAN score on the same disc....since they're both Carmichael scores.

 
 
 Posted:   Dec 28, 2007 - 7:34 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

Ralph is a very sweet guy -- and still very active in music -- doing Big Band things and such. After 4D MAN, he just didn't get any calls to do any films, and anyway, his musical instincts were taking him into different directions. But something tells me he could have had a very successful film career given the scope of what he's accomplished in so many musical fields over the decades.

We did a bit of work with the Valentino material to make it sound better, and I think you'll be happy with the "upgrade" from your CDR, if you do purchase our disc. As for 4D MAN, we would've had to lose the Valentino library cues to include that, and I think they're a whole lot of fun.

 
 Posted:   Dec 29, 2007 - 6:52 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)

I recieved my copy of each yesterday(very quck for the time of year).While i haven't played them both properlyI can say I like what I have heard so far.I quite like the Lavagnino and Nascimbene pieces -brief but juicy.

 
 Posted:   Dec 31, 2007 - 10:09 AM   
 By:   John Morgan   (Member)

What a delight this music is. And the sound is sensational. I love the original orchestral main title, but I love the song too. I wish they would have put the song on as a sort of precredit Overture and left the symphonic main title alone, but....

And the music is so creepy with those "Quatermass-like" violin licks. This brings back so many great memories. It was one of the first horror films I saw in a theater back in the late fifties, and one forgets how well written and moody this music really is.

A lot of films today could benefit from this level of scoring.

Bravo to MMM.

Now, onto The Intruder.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2008 - 7:36 AM   
 By:   Stefan Schlegel   (Member)

While i haven't played them both properlyI can say I like what I have heard so far.I quite like the Lavagnino and Nascimbene pieces -brief but juicy.

The two minute Nascimbene piece, by the way, is the Main Title from the 1961 epic movie I LANCIERI NERI (US title: THE BLACK LANCERS) with Mel Ferrer in the leading rolle.
A mastertape with about 35 minutes coming from Nascimbene's own private archives does exist and has quite good sound quality.
I am wondering that this piece could not be identified on the BLOB CD. The Italian music publisher in 1961 was a company called "Gallazzi" and it is strange that this track ended up with the Valentino library.
However I can't recognize the two Lavagnino pieces and suppose that they are real library tracks.

 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2008 - 8:14 AM   
 By:   Damian   (Member)


The two minute Nascimbene piece, by the way, is the Main Title from the 1961 epic movie I LANCIERI NERI (US title: THE BLACK LANCERS) with Mel Ferrer in the leading rolle.
A mastertape with about 35 minutes coming from Nascimbene's own private archives does exist and has quite good sound quality.
I am wondering that this piece could not be identified on the BLOB CD. The Italian music publisher in 1961 was a company called "Gallazzi" and it is strange that this track ended up with the Valentino library.
However I can't recognize the two Lavagnino pieces and suppose that they are real library tracks.


Thanks for the little bit of info about the Nascimbene track.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2008 - 12:05 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

Stefan -- Thanks so much for the information! Where were you when I needed you? I had e-mailed sound samples of the Lavagnino and Nascimbene tracks to a wide variety of Lavagnino/Nascimbene "experts" over a period of two years, and none of them could identify the music. I even sent them to people who had affiliations with the composers, but alas, nothing turned up. Eventually, I had to give up trying to figure it out, or else the CDs would have never been released.

As I mentioned in my notes, Nascimbene's piece "was probably penned for a sword-and-sandal or historical movie assignment, and later became a part of the music library," and it sounds like that's the deal. While I've never seen THE BLACK LANCERS, I'm surprised none of my contacts had either, or if they had, that they didn't recall the music.

I'm not ready to assume that the Lavagnino pieces were composed specifically for a music library, although they sound like they might have been. Perhaps one of these days we'll know for sure?

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2008 - 1:27 PM   
 By:   Stefan Schlegel   (Member)

Thanks for your nice words, David.
I was not away, but here in Germany and you could have contacted me at any time about the Nascimbene track.
I am very surprised that none of all the people you had asked did know or recognize this theme, because it crops up quite often in the BLACK LANCERS score. And the mastertape copy has been around for 2 or 3 years among collectors.

In the meantime I have also asked another Italian Lavagnino expert (who knew Lavagnino personally) about the two Lavagnino tracks, but he also doesn't know them. One of the cues sounds as if it could come from a historical movie set during the baroque era, but the other one really seems more to be a typical library cue for holiday travels or something like that.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2008 - 1:40 PM   
 By:   MMM   (Member)

It never even entered my mind to contact you because I have an uncanny ability not to connect names with areas of expertise when it comes to message boards. So even though I've read your posts all the time through the years, it never dawned on me that there was a real Nascimbene expert out there as opposed to a number of people, each of whom had a little Nascimbene knowledge, if that makes any sense. There's so little discussion about classic Italian scores on this board (non-spaghetti western, that is) that it didn't enter my mind that somebody posting here might have the information I was seeking. So I stupidly went to people who were friends with Nascimbene and Lavagnino, thinking they would have the answers!

And come to think of it, I don't even know if Stefan S is your real name or a pseudonym? We have a couple of customers in Germany named "Stefan," but with a different last name. There are some other Italian film music experts I contacted in Germany, but none of them were able to help.

I would tend to agree with you about the Lavagnino tracks -- if only one of them is a library track, then "Holiday Excursion" is the likely one. Do you know if Lavagnino wrote music for industrial films or shorts? I could picture that sort of music being re-used in a library, even if it wasn't originally written for that kind of use.

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2008 - 2:30 PM   
 By:   Stefan Schlegel   (Member)

No problem about not contacting me, but I can assure you trhat it is my real name I use here.
Indeed there is often very little discussion about classic Italian film music, but if there is then I often take part. Maybe you can remember that I was also one of those who did announce the release of Lavagnino's SAFFO CD here last year.
Yes, Lavagnino did write music for some TV shorts, but he also did compose about 1400 orchestral pieces for library purposes. There is an ineterview with him in the old Belgian Soundtrack magazine (SCN 21 from April 1980)where he complained about the fact that after working on THE LOST CONTINENT in Indonesia when he came back to Italy those stockpiled pieces had all been given away:
"The company was broke and they'd virtually given them away. The company sold some of my pieces to GUNGALA, some to BEHIND THE GREAT WALL, some here, some there...Even the newsreel "Mondo Libero" used them, for their opening and closing titles. My 1400 pieces included 80 marches, for example state marches, semi-formal marches, colour marches, dead marches and foreign marches. All the dramatic occasions were covered, like Zeppelin exploding, and all the tragic incidents since the Flood. My repertoire also provided each sporting occasion with a theme, whether it be horeseriding, football, cycliong, boxing or judo. However, seeing my music put to use in this way, no matter how skilfully, has always been painful and loathsome to me."

 
 
 Posted:   Jan 3, 2008 - 5:17 PM   
 By:   Pete Apruzzese   (Member)

Just got through my first listen of The Blob and it's a superb release. Can't wait to get The Intruder going next.

Thanks David and everyone at MMM!

 
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