Film Score Monthly
Screen Archives Entertainment 250 Golden and Silver Age Classics on CD from 1996-2013! Exclusive distribution by SCREEN ARCHIVES ENTERTAINMENT.
Wild Bunch, The King Kong: The Deluxe Edition (2CD) Body Heat Friends of Eddie Coyle/Three Days of the Condor, The It's Alive Ben-Hur Nightwatch/Killer by Night Gremlins Space Children/The Colossus of New York, The
FSM HOME MESSAGE BOARD FSM CDs FSM ONLINE RESOURCES FUN STUFF ABOUT US  SEARCH FSM   
LOG IN
Forgot Login?
Register
Search Archives
Film Score Friday
Latest Edition
Previous Edition
Archive Edition
The Aisle Seat
Latest Edition
Previous Edition
Archive Edition
View Mode
Regular | Headlines
All times are PT (Pacific Time), U.S.A.
Site Map
Visits since
February 5, 2001:
14916936
© 2018 Film Score Monthly.
All Rights Reserved.
   VIEW: REGULAR | HEADLINES ONLY << PREVIOUS 10  |  NEXT 10 >>   
Aisle Seat 4-4: Wanderers, Twilight Time, April New Releases
Posted By Andy Dursin 4/3/2017 - 9:00 PM
There were a handful of gang-related pictures made in the late ‘70s, from Walter Hill’s “The Warriors” to George Romero’s “Knightriders,” but the film that’s proven to be the most durable – even though it received the least exposure at the time – was Philip Kaufman’s superb, atmospheric THE WANDERERS (****, 117/123 mins., R). This 1979 effort from director Kaufman (“The Right Stuff”) isn’t just head and shoulders above its similarly-themed cinematic counterparts, but multiple viewings confirm it’s one of the finest films of its decade altogether.
Comments:   (read on)
Film Score Friday 3/31/17
Posted By Scott Bettencourt 3/30/2017 - 9:00 PM
Intrada plans to release one new CD next week.


Kritzerland's latest release is the first-ever CD of the score for the 1967 science-fiction comedy ROCKET TO THE MOON (aka Those Fantastic Flying Fools), starring Burl Ives and Terry-Thomas and loosely inspired by the books of Jules Verne. The score was composed by John Scott (back when he was billed as Patrick John Scott), and was originally released in England on an LP so rare that even I, who have been collecting soundtracks for more than 40 years, didn't even know of its existence until a few weeks ago.


This weekend I was listening to the soundtrack LP for writer-director S. Craig Zahler's terrific horror Western BONE TOMAHAWK, with its score composed by Jeff Herriott and Zahler himself. It's been nearly a year and a half since I saw the film, and it's low-key, somber music wasn't especially fresh in my memory, so it wasn't until the end title song played that I realized I was playing the album at the wrong speed -- because nowhere on the album label, the cover, the inserts, or even the sticker on the plastic wrap, did it mention that the album was meant to be played at 45 rpm (nor is it mentioned on the label's website, or on the album's Amazon listing). That's the kind of information that's handy to know when you put an album on the turntable.

Comments:   (read on)
Aisle Seat 3-28: Spring Arrival Edition
Posted By Andy Dursin 3/27/2017 - 9:00 PM
The New World Pictures vaults have opened up and B-movie fans have not one but two choice offerings thanks to Kino Lorber’s Studio Classics line this month, including the memorable Tatum O’Neal/Irene Cara team-up CERTAIN FURY (87 mins., 1985, R) and Sybil Danning’s oddball exploitation pic THEY’RE PLAYING WITH FIRE (96 mins., 1984, R). I remember seeing “Certain Fury” listed on a handful of “Worst of 1985″ lists, but was too young to actually sit through it. Decades later, all of us have that opportunity thanks to Kino Lorber’s Blu-Ray and this insane exploitation picture – directed by Stephen Gyllenhaal (dad to Jake and Maggie) – does not disappoint.
Comments:   (read on)
Film Score Friday 3/24/17
Posted By Scott Bettencourt 3/23/2017 - 9:00 PM
The latest CD from Intrada pairs two previously unreleased scores by two-time Oscar winner Leonard Rosenman -- the Satanic car chase thriller RACE WITH THE DEVIL, and the groundbreaking gay drama MAKING LOVE.


Tadlow's new recording of cues and suites from Jerry Goldsmith's Emmy-nominated music for the 60s TV anthology series THRILLER is now available to pre-order.


The latest release from Kritzerland features the Oscar-nominated music from the first feature film based on Charles Schulz' Peanuts comic strip, A BOY NAMED CHARLIE BROWN. The film incorporated Vince Guaraldi's beloved original themes from the TV specials as well as original songs by Rod McKuen and underscore by John Scott Trotter, and all three men were nominated for Music (Original Song Score), along with lyricists Bill Melendez and Al Shean. Multiple LPs of the film's music were released at the time, including one that also featured other McKuen themes and which was recently released on CD by Varese Sarabande. This Kritzerland release is the first-ever release of the complete score and songs recorded for the film.

Comments:   (read on)
The March Issue of FSMO Is Live!
Posted By Tim Curran 3/21/2017 - 2:00 AM
The March edition of FSM ONLINE is now live. In this month’s cover story, MICHAEL ABELS takes us behind his score to Jordan Peele’s surprise horror sensation GET OUT. Also this month, HENRY JACKMAN monkeys around with KONG: SKULL ISLAND; MARCO BELTRAMI returns to the X-Men-verse to score HUGH JACKMAN’S LOGAN; an interview with PATRICK JONSSON about composing for the Oscar-winning documentary short THE WHITE HELMETS; a TOP 10 list of favorite BASEBALL FILM SCORES; Cary Wong’s Academy Awards post-mortem; a Score Restore of THE HEIRESS by AARON COPLAND; a new Hitchcockian Gold Rush discusses DIMITRI TIOMKIN and SHADOW OF A DOUBT; more embedded audio clips, and more.


Subscribers, you’ll get notification by email shortly. Or, just go here to log in. For those who want to join FSM ONLINE, go here, click on the “Subscribe” link and follow the instructions. And email us if you have any questions.
 
Sincerely,
 
Your Friends at FSM ONLINE

Comments:   (read on)
Aisle Seat 3-21: A KONG-Sized March Rundown
Posted By Andy Dursin 3/20/2017 - 9:00 PM
When you get right down it, for a pop-culture icon like King Kong, it’s surprising that the Big Ape hasn’t had a whole lot of cinematic success. Sure, the 1933 RKO original is an all-time masterwork, but you can’t say the same about its hastily produced sequel “Son of Kong,” its decent – if not somewhat overlooked – 1976 Dino DeLaurentiis remake, or that version’s own, terrible follow-up “King Kong Lives.” A pair of ‘60s Toho productions brought Kong to Japan – including a silly skirmish with Godzilla – and the best you can say about them is that they’re at least more fun than Peter Jackson’s self-indulgent 2005 remake of the original, which was both miscast and painfully overlong.
Comments:   (read on)
Film Score Friday 3/17/17
Posted By Scott Bettencourt 3/16/2017 - 9:00 PM
Intrada plans to release one new CD next week.


Varese Sarabande has announced the latest releases in their limited edition CD Club series, which can be ordered now and should already be shipping.

The romantic drama STANLEY & IRIS, starring Jane Fonda and Robert De Niro, was the final film directed by the great Martin Ritt (Hud, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, Sounder), and featured one of John Williams's most underrated scores. Varese originally released a CD with 29 minutes of Williams' lovely score at the time of the film's 1990 release, but their new Deluxe Edition not only adds additional cues but also includes the first-ever release of Williams' 20-minute score for Ritt's 1972 romantic comedy-drama PETE 'N' TILLIE, which starred Walter Matthau and Carol Burnett and earned Oscar nominations for Julius J. Epstein's screenplay and Geraldine Page's supporting performance. (When I was 11 years old, this was my favorite movie -- I don't know if it was because it was partly shot in my home town, or because I subconsciously identified with Burnett's character, somehow realizing I would grow up to become a wisecracking redheaded spinster).

In the 1990s, it seemed like half the action films being produced could be described as "Die Hard on a...", and after Steven Seagal had his biggest hit with the "Die Hard on a battleship" Under Siege (which earned two Oscar nominations and led to director Andrew Davis and co-star Tommy Lee Jones reteaming for The Fugitive the following year), it was only to be expected that "the cook from Under Siege" (as the sequel's trailer described Seagal's character) should return for the "Die Hard on a train" sequel UNDER SIEGE 2: DARK TERRITORY. Geoff Murphy (Utu, Young Guns II) was the director this time, and the supporting cast included acclaimed stage monologuist Eric Bogosian as the villain and a 16-year-old Katherine Heigl as Seagal's daughter. The rousing score was composed by the great Basil Poledouris, and while Varese's previous Under Siege 2 release was from the era when score CDs were habitually only 30 minutes long for financial reasons, their Deluxe Edition expands Poledouris' score to a whopping 75 minutes.

Their third CD Club release is an Encore Edition re-release of their out-of-print CD of THE BLACK CAULDRON, the Disney-produced animated fantasy with a symphonic score by Elmer Bernstein, for which he re-recorded 32 minutes of his score for the Varese LP/CD (the original Bernstein score tracks were released decades later by Intrada).

Comments:   (read on)
Aisle Seat 3-14: Shout's Pre-Spring Blu-Ray Fling
Posted By Andy Dursin 3/13/2017 - 9:00 PM
In the annals of misguided, terrible sequels, ROBOCOP 2 (*½, 117 mins., 1990, R) stands out in a crowded pack. Hastily produced to lessen the financial burdens of fading Orion Pictures, haphazardly constructed with a script that was overhauled daily by a comic book scribe who had never written a film before, and directed by a Hollywood veteran who apparently recognized its problems (but wasn’t the film’s first choice), “Robocop 2″ made modest cash in the Summer of 1990 but still failed completely to fulfill its two goals – keeping Orion afloat and maintaining Robocop as a viable box-office presence of his own.
Comments:   (read on)
Film Score Friday 3/10/17
Posted By Scott Bettencourt 3/9/2017 - 9:00 PM
The latest release from Intrada is the first-ever commercial release of Bruce Broughton's charming score for writer-producer John Hughes' 1994 comedy BABY'S DAY OUT. In one of the many composer shuffles that were common in the mid-90s, Jerry Goldsmith was originally announced to score the film but had to bow out due to a scheduling conflict, and Broughton (who famously had to back out of Hughes' Home Alone due to a conflict with The Rescuers Down Under) contributed his usual melodic gift and light orchestral touch, even later remarking in an interview on his fondness for the film. A rare, 38-minute promotional CD of Broughton's score was released around the time of the film, but Intrada's Baby's Day Out features more than twice as much Broughton music.


The latest CD from Kritzerland presents the first-ever release of the original score tracks from one of Henry Mancini's loveliest scores of the 1960s, for the time-jumping marital romantic comedy-drama TWO FOR THE ROAD, starring Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, directed by the great Stanley Donen, and featuring an Oscar-nominated screenplay by Frederic Raphael (Darling). Mancini's score was shortlisted for an Oscar nomination that year (as was his Wait Until Dark), and as with nearly all Mancini scores from that era, the commercially released soundtrack LP, later released on CD, was a re-recording emphaszing source cues.


Varese Sarabande plans to announce their next batch of limited edition CD Club releases next Monday. 

Comments:   (read on)
Aisle Seat 3-7: March Arrival Edition
Posted By Andy Dursin 3/6/2017 - 9:00 PM
Twilight Time’s quartet of February releases offer a fantastic Fox film noir, a return trip to Woody Allen territory, a Columbia Cinemascope vehicle starring Cornel Wilde, and a moody 1979 “anti rom-com” that’s the kind of film major studios wouldn’t touch these days.
Comments:   (read on)
<< PREVIOUS 10  |  NEXT 10 >>
Film Score Monthly Online
Dario Marianelli’s Darkest Notes
The Incredible Shrinking Composer
The Showmen of Showman
Movie Music for End Titles Heads for Extinction at Lincoln Center
Wong's Turn: 2017 Memo to the Academy Music Branch
The Magnificent Seven: Directors Who Yield Great Scores, Part 3
Gold Rush: The Unseen Heroine and Franz Waxman's Ghost Orchestra
Ear of the Month Contest: Maurice Jarre
Concert Review: Not A Very Long Time Ago in a Concert Hall Far, Far Away
Today in Film Score History:
January 20
Basil Poledouris records his score for the Twilight Zone episode “Monsters!” (1986)
Bronislau Kaper begins recording his score to The Prodigal (1955)
Christopher Young’s scores for the Twilight Zone episodes “A Matter of Minutes” and “A Small Talent for War” are recorded (1986)
Emil Newman born (1911)
Franz Waxman begins recording his score to Untamed (1955)
Gerry Mulligan died (1996)
John Beal born (1947)
Pedro Bromfman born (1976)
Recording sessions begin for John Powell’s score to Agent Cody Banks (2003)
Recording sessions begin for Miklos Rozsa's score for Double Indemnity (1944)
FSMO Featured Video
Video Archive • Audio Archive
Podcasts
© 2018 Film Score Monthly. All Rights Reserved.